Monday, August 18, 2014

Yellow Mountain Fur Peak or Huangshan Maofeng

Hailed as the best of Mao Feng tea, Huang Shan Mao Feng has a sparrow-tongue-like shape, silvery white fuzz, golden liquid, refreshingly mellow and sweet taste, and the brewed leaves are tender yellow. [x]

China’s Famous Teas → 3/10

sweetoothdesign:

Our Latest Project, Alchemy of Tea, is available on Kickstarter Now! Alchemy of Tea is the First Poster that Depicts Famously Known Tea Recipes Around the World. For more details, click HERE!

Tuesday, May 27, 2014 Tuesday, May 13, 2014
verdantly:

Blueberry pancake, smells and tastes like it. Divine. #davidstea #tea

verdantly:

Blueberry pancake, smells and tastes like it. Divine. #davidstea #tea

Saturday, May 3, 2014

finestestate:

mingsonjia:

Yixing clay is a type of clay from the region near the city of Yixing in Jiangsu province, China. Its use dates back to the Song Dynasty (960 - 1279). From the 17th century on, the Yixing wares were commonly exported to Europe. The finished stoneware, which is used for teaware and other small items, are usually red or brown in color. They are known as Zisha ware, and are typically unglazed. 

The term “yixing clay” is often used as an umbrella term to describe several distinct types of clay used to make stoneware:

Zisha or Zi Ni (紫砂 or 紫泥 ; literally, “purple sand/clay”): this stoneware has a purple-red-brown color.

Zhusha or Zhu Ni (朱砂 or 朱泥; literally, “cinnabar sand/clay”): reddish brown stoneware with a very high iron content. The name only refers to the sometimes bright red hue of cinnabar. There are currently 10 mines still producing Zhu Ni. However, due to the increasing demand for Yixing stoneware, Zhu Ni is now in very limited quantities. Zhu Ni clay is not to be confused with Hong Ni (红泥, literally, “red clay”).

Duan Ni (鍛泥; literally, “fortified clay”): stoneware that was formulated using various stones and minerals in addition to Zi Ni or Zhu Ni clay. This results in various textures and colors, ranging from beige, blue, and green (绿泥), to black.

Yixing teawares are prized because their unglazed surfaces absorb traces of the beverage, creating a more complex flavor. For these reasons, yixing teawares should never be washed using detergents, but rather with water only, and connoisseurs recommend using each tea vessel for one kind of tea (white, green, oolong, or black) or sometimes even one variety of tea only.

Picture credits: 台湾 玉凡轩 

The most beautiful collection of yixing teapots!

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Spring Snail or Biluochun

Originating in the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), Green Snail Spring Tea, or Bi Luo Chun is grown on Dongting Mountain in Wu County outside of Suzhou in Jiangsu Province. It is often Biluochun, Pi Luo Chun or Piluochun. Its name’s literal translation means Green Snail Spring Tea. “Green” because it is a Green Tea, “Snail” because the finished tea is curled like a snail shell, and “Spring” because that is when it is harvested.The tea is known for its strong fragrance and so was originally called “Scary Fragrance Tea”. The tea is known for its delicate appearance, fruity taste, and lingering floral aroma. The leaves used are very small so that one Kilogram of finished tea leaves requires over 14,000 tea buds.

China’s Famous Teas → 2/10
Monday, April 7, 2014
thalassarche:

Longjing green tea (西湖龙井), sometimes known by its direct English translation of dragon well. Produced in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China. It is pan-fried soon after it is picked, and often picked by hand. The demand for longjing has led to many imitation teas, but true longjing is grown from specially cultivated trees in Hangzhou, and has a fuller aroma and lingering aftertaste than teas claimed to be longjing that have different origin. Longjing is one of China’s Famous Teas (中国名茶). 

thalassarche:

Longjing green tea (西湖龙井), sometimes known by its direct English translation of dragon well. Produced in HangzhouZhejiang Province, China. It is pan-fried soon after it is picked, and often picked by hand. The demand for longjing has led to many imitation teas, but true longjing is grown from specially cultivated trees in Hangzhou, and has a fuller aroma and lingering aftertaste than teas claimed to be longjing that have different origin. Longjing is one of China’s Famous Teas (中国名茶)

Sunday, April 6, 2014